Ashish Khemka
Ansys Employee
Hi @skadam, For isotropic hardening, the yield surface is symmetric about the stress axes, which means the yield strength in tension and compression are the same and they remain equal with the development of the yield surface. However, this is not true for most materials in reality. The yield strength in tension and compression grows differently. Usually, an increase in tensile yield strength occurs at the expense of compressive yield strength. We can this Bauschinger effect. Kinematic hardening takes Bauschinger effect in account.