Fluids

Fluids

Change the RULES of a simulation

    • Ric_Rin_DTU
      Subscriber

      Good morning,

      I am simulating the fluid dynamics of a tube that contains a porous medium. A gaseous mixture (mainly CO, H2, CO2 and small amounts of inert gases) enters the tube at 473K and is heated up by the presence of an external heating medium (that surrounds the tube and is assumed to be at a constant temperature of 240°C).

      I would like the porous medium to have the same temperature as the fluid along the entire tube. In other words, I would like to impose "Isothermal" in the "Heat transfer" option of the "Solid Models" tab, and then insert the variable temperature ("T") instead of a constant value (the temperature of my solid changes and it it equal to the one of the fluid). When I try to do it, I get the following message:

      Parameter 'Solid Temperature' in object '/FLOW:Flow Analysis 1/DOMAIN:Default Domain/SOLID MODELS/HEAT TRANSFER MODEL' is not allowed to be assigned an expression value that depends on variables. It must be assigned a numeric value, or an expression that resolves to a constant value.

      I have read that it is it possible to change the rules of a simulation, but I was unable to do it. Could anyone explain in detail how I should put the dependency of the "Solid Temperature" to the option "ANY" and then make my file read my RULES?

      Thanks a lot,

      Riccardo

    • DrAmine
      Ansys Employee
      Will that not be a result of the heat transfer across the porous-fluid interface?
      What is the expression you want to use?
      What you are trying to do might be feasible but I have never tested. You need to read that part you change as additional solver argument with -ccl on startup. I recommend how to steer all that via HTC.
    • Ric_Rin_DTU
      Subscriber
      Dear DrAmine thanks a lot for the kind reply.
      I have found a much easier way to have the solid temperature equal to the fluid one: it is just necessary to utilize a very high fluid - solid heat transfer coefficient.
      I must admit that it was not an idea of mine, but was suggested by an expert!
      Riccardo


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