Fluids

Fluids

Pressure at a point for a multiphase simulation

    • rammohan.telikicherla
      Subscriber

      Hello,

      I am trying to create a plot for pressure at a point for a multiphase simulation where I want the pressure of one phase not the mixture at the point.

      Would you please let me know if it is possible to do it and if so how can I plot it?

      Thank you

    • Rob
      Ansys Employee

      The pressure tends to be a mixture property, why would a phase have a different pressure to an adjacent phase? 

    • rammohan.telikicherla
      Subscriber

      Hello,

      It makes sense since pressure is a mixture property it does not change for the adjacent phase. I plotted the pressure of the mixture at a point using vertex average and figured it out.

      Thank you very much. 

    • oscar.banos_garcia
      Subscriber

      I am also confused here. In point 14.5.1 of the Fluent Theory Guide it is said that "a single pressure is shared by all phases". However in point 14.5.4.2.3 the equation (14.182) has a term p_s which is defined as s^th solids pressure. What is represented by this term?

    • Rob
      Ansys Employee

      Solids pressure https://ansyshelp.ansys.com/account/secured?returnurl=/Views/Secured/corp/v222/en/flu_th/flu_th_sec_eulermp_theory_solid_p.html  is a little different. It's linked to packing limits and the granular interactions: it's not a "pressure" in the sense of the continous phase definition. The equivalent is granular viscosity and granular temperature, they refer to granule flow and "bounce" so also cause some confusion. 

      When asking about equations please post a link (off line help has an option in the top right of the page) as equation and section numbers can vary between versions. 

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