Fluids

Fluids

Thin Wall and Wall Shadow – Fluent

    • vsjay3
      Subscriber

      Hi All,

      I have two doubts that I would like to have clarified if possible,

      (1) If I model a pipe (shown in light blue in the image), initially there will be zero wall thickness (blue wall). However if I assign a thin wall thickness of say 5mm, my question is in which direction would this extra 5mm thickness grow? That is will this new thickness be generated away (outwards) from the pipe wall surface (Fig.1) or inwards into the pipe (towards the interior of the pipe) (Fig. 2)?

      (Blue circle is initial zero thickness wall of pipe. Red circle is new surface of 5mm thickness)

    • Rob
      Ansys Employee
      Neither. If you have a wall surface in Fluent it has no physical thickness. If you make it 5mm thick it has a thickness for conductivity etc but is still thin as far as the geometry is concerned. n
    • vsjay3
      Subscriber
      Thanks for answering Rob. nI will be modelling heat transfer across the pipe wall and I believe the pipe wall thickness (5 mm) would play a major role in my end calculations and results.nSo according to your reply, the Thin wall thickness option in Fluent is not really the best option if I consider the pipe wall thickness to be a critical factor in my heat transfer results, since the Thin wall thickness option does not actually treat the thin wall as a physical wall?nIn that case do you suggest that I should separately model the 5mm pipe wall thickness as a physical wall in my model itself with its own meshing (without the use of Thin wall thickness option) if I consider the pipe wall thickness to be important?.Thank you!n
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